Trump legal news brief: Judge sentences Navarro to 4 months in prison for contempt of Congress

Date:

Share post:


U.S. District Judge Ahmit Mehta sentences Peter Navarro, a former trade adviser in Donald Trump’s administration, to a four month prison sentence for his defiance of a congressional subpoena issued by the House Jan. 6 select committee. Navarro worked with former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon, who has also been sentenced to four months in prison for defying a subpoena issued by the committee, to devise a strategy to overturn Trump’s loss in the 2020 election. Here are the latest legal developments surrounding the former president running for re-election in 2024.

Jan. 6 election interference

Peter Navarro sentenced to four months in prison for defying Congressional subpoena

Key players: Former Trump trade adviser Peter Navarro, U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta, former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon

  • On Thursday, Mehta handed Navarro a four-month prison sentence and a fine of $9,500 after he was found guilty of two counts of contempt of Congress for defying a subpoena issued by the House Jan. 6 select committee, the Guardian reported.

  • During his trial, Navarro said he believed executive privilege shielded him from having to cooperate with the committee, but he failed to produce evidence that Trump had extended that privilege to him.

  • “The words executive privilege are not magical incantations,” Mehta said during the sentencing hearing.

  • Prosecutors had asked the judge to sentence Navarro to six months in prison.

  • Bannon also received a four-month prison sentence on the same contempt of Congress charges, but his lawyers are appealing that decision.

  • Navarro worked with Bannon on a plan they called “the Green Bay sweep” that sought to use Republican lawmakers to contest ballots in the 2020 election in order to overturn Trump’s defeat in key swing states.

  • Mehta has yet to decide whether Navarro must begin serving his sentence immediately or whether it can be delayed pending an appeal by his lawyers.

Why it matters: Prison sentences for contempt of Congress are rare, but the cases against Bannon and Navarro underscore the larger legal peril facing Trump and those who helped him devise a plot to overturn the 2020 election.

Recommended reading

________________________

Wednesday, January 24

________________________

Judge Tanya Chutkan announces that a trial she will oversee for Jan. 6 defendant Anthony Mastanduno will begin on April 2, making it clear that former President Donald Trump’s trial on election interference charges will be pushed back. Here are the latest court developments for the former White House occupant seeking reelection in 2024.

Jan. 6 election interference

Chutkan scheduling decision indicates Trump’s trial will be delayed

Key players: Jan. 6 defendant Anthony Mastanduno, U.S. District Court Judge Tanya Chutkan, United States Supreme Court

  • In a court docket filing issued Wednesday, Chutkan announced she had scheduled a trial for Mastanduno to begin on April 2, a clear indication that Trump’s trial, which was supposed to begin on March 4, would indeed be delayed.

  • Chutkan had already indicated that the trial would be delayed. Last week, she issued an order preventing special counsel Jack Smith from filing motions in the case without permission, Politico reported, while Trump pursues his appeals of Chutkan’s ruling that presidential immunity claims do not protect him from being prosecuted for his attempts to overturn the 2020 election.

  • The U.S. Court of Appeals is expected to rule soon on the matter, but if that decision goes against him, Trump is expected to take his appeal to the Supreme Court.

  • Wednesday’s announcement made it likely that the earliest Trump’s federal election interference trial could begin would be mid-April.

  • Mastanduno is charged with “civil disorder and assaulting, resisting, or impeding certain officers using a dangerous weapon, both felony offenses,” according to the Department of Justice.

  • He is one of 1,265 people who have been arrested and charged for their actions on Jan. 6, 2021, when a violent mob of Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol building to try to block the Electoral College certification of Trump’s loss to Joe Biden in 2020.

  • At least 749 defendants have been sentenced so far, with at least 467 of them receiving prison time, the DOJ said.

Why it matters: Trump has long sought to delay the trial proceedings in the many cases against him. Polls have consistently found that a criminal conviction could significantly diminish his support among voters in 2024.

____________________

Tuesday, January 23

____________________

The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit denies a request by former President Donald Trump to lift or revisit a gag order put in place by Judge Tanya Chutkan in the federal election interference case designed to prevent him from commenting about witnesses and courtroom staff in the case. Here are the latest legal developments for the former president hoping to be reelected to the White House in 2024.

Jan. 6 election interference

Appeals court rejects Trump request to consider lifting gag order

Key players: U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, Judge Tanya Chutkan, special counsel Jack Smith, United States Supreme Court

  • On Tuesday, the court denied a request by Trump’s lawyers to rehear arguments on whether to lift a gag order put in place by Chutkan aimed at preventing Trump from disparaging witnesses and courtroom staff in the federal election interference case against him, ABC News reported.

  • None of the 11 justices on the appeals court requested a vote on the issue of reexamining the gag order. That means that the Supreme Court is Trump’s only remaining venue to challenge the gag order.

  • In December, a federal appeals court also upheld the gag order.

  • Trump is not prevented from criticizing Smith, the appeals court ruled.

  • The election interference case brought by Smith is on hold until the Supreme Court issues a ruling on whether presidential immunity protects Trump from prosecution stemming from his efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election.

Why it matters: As with the question of presidential immunity, the Supreme Court could now be the final lifeline for Trump in terms of his ability to defy Chutkan’s attempts to keep him from attacking those who appear in her courtroom.

E. Jean Carroll defamation lawsuit

COVID fears push back Trump testimony until Wednesday

Key players: Judge Lewis Kaplan, Trump lawyer Alina Habba, columnist E. Jean Carroll

  • Trump is expected to take the witness stand on Wednesday in the second civil defamation trial brought by Carroll after Kaplan delayed the proceedings due to the illness of a juror, USA Today reported.

  • On Monday, the juror was tested for COVID-19, and Habba also indicated that she had been exposed to the virus.

  • Habba asked Kaplan to postpone the proceedings until Wednesday so that Trump could travel to New Hampshire, which is holding its presidential primary on Tuesday.

  • The trial is expected to wrap up this week.

Why it matters: It remains unclear whether Trump, who continues to defame Carroll, will take the witness stand in his own defense. His persistent attacks on her character and his denial that he never sexually assaulted her even though a separate jury concluded that he did, could prove costly.



Source link

Alexandra Williams
Alexandra Williams
Alexandra Williams is a writer and editor. Angeles. She writes about politics, art, and culture for LinkDaddy News.

Recent posts

Related articles

Wicked Little Letters

In the 1920s, a scandal rocks an English seaside town in this mystery comedy based on a...

Dogs jump in stranger’s car — and won’t budge, Florida cops say. ‘Holding my car hostage’

Dogs jumped into a stranger’s car — and unexpectedly took over the front seats, Florida photos show.Facebook...

An Old Doctored Video of Trump’s ‘Wig’ Flying Off Recirculates

American presidential history is riddled with countless legends, mysteries, and conspiracy theories: Did George Washington actually have...

Nvidia’s Q4 earnings will be a referendum on the AI trade as revenue expected to jump 234%

Nvidia (NVDA) will announce its fourth quarter earnings after the bell on Wednesday, one of the most...

'Just tell the honest truth!': Ramit Sethi slams Kevin O'Leary for repeating the tired trope of creating wealth by skipping coffee, says 'frugality' isn't...

Buying coffee to-go has become a hot topic in personal finance. Some high-profile financial experts are convinced...

‘I’ve never seen so many overdrafts!’: 24-year-old dropped steady jobs to pursue unprofitable gigs — doesn’t want to pay back $10,000 in student loans....

A record-breaking 5.5 million new business applications were registered in 2023, according to the U.S. Chamber of...

Why Trump may soon rake in a $4 billion payday despite his legal problems

In a blistering 92-page opinion, New York Supreme Court Justice Arthur Engoron delivered an impressive tutorial to...

Donald Trump's New Self-Proclaimed Status Has People Reaching For Dictionaries

Donald Trump raised eyebrows with his latest brazen boast to Fox News personality Laura Ingraham on Tuesday.During...